Archive for the 'Carmenère' Category

Taste Chile 2010, Vancouver

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the “Taste Chile” event held at the former Storyeum in Gastown.  The tasting gave me a chance to re-connect with the wines of Chile, as I have somewhat neglected these choices lately in favour of the Old World wines my palate has come to crave.

The afternoon began with a sit-down tutorial of 13 wines of biodynamic and organic origin.  The discussion began with a rather lengthy overview of the process of biodynamics, perhaps a little more detailed than was necessary given the short time frame and solid knowledge base of those in attendance.

The first two wines sparked quite a debate over whether or not organic means better wine.  This waged on for quite a period of time, and while interesting, did move the focus away from the actual tasting tutorial.  That said, the topic is of great interest.  Many of the wines do not state that they are in fact organic and biodynamic anywhere on their labels.  It appears they want the wines to speak louder than the process.

Interesting…   The discussion then moved to “does the fact that it is organic mean that it is better wine?”  At this point I reflected back to the words of Alan Meadows who asserts that “organic and biodynamic ultimately mean greater attention to detail.”  From there, questions about sustainability after production with regard to packaging and shipping were addressed, but it was a little hard to hear, as the room had no PA.

These are all very interesting topics surrounding the ethics of wine.  The conclusions I drew from this were that Chile has quite an opportunity in its grasp.   The fact that the world particularly our local community has amorous pursuit of all things organic (a good thing for sure, provided our eyes are wide open), and the market is such that many of these wines are truly exceptional values for under $20.

Given the extended discussion, the actual guided part of tasting the remaining 11 wines was packed into the last 20 or so minutes.  At this point, most in the room had self-guided through what proved to be some really interesting choices.  A few of my favorites included:

Emiliana Vineyards Adobe Chardonnay 2010 – Really crisp and clean with nice mineral citrus and grassy.  For $16 this is a really nice wine for a seafood dinner.

Nativa Gran Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon 2007 – Great spice on the nose, loads of mint, and almost cumin hints.  Really dark cherry and currant through to a nice balanced finish.

Vina San Pedro Tarapaca Tarapaca Plus 2008 – Again, this has a really nice spice mix on the nose with pine, rosemary and tobacco with a hint of orange peel after a swirl.  Just a few sniffs of this one sold me, and for $20 I’ll be on the lookout for this one.

The tasting room itself had a fantastic layout, but as with the Playhouse festival last year, the low lighting was a challenge in approaching the wines.  The wineries ringed the room, with a few specialty stations in the center.

Highlights for me included:

Whites

Chardonnay dominated my white tasting, and I really enjoyed the mix of unoaked, Chablis styles and the more toasty rich ones.  Some highlights included:

  • Amanya Chardonnay, 2008 Ledya Valley
  • Errazuriz Wild Ferment Chardonnay, 2009 Aconcagua Valley
  • Montes Alpha Chardonnay, 2008 Colchagua Valley

Reds

The reds were a great mix of Cabs, Carménère and tasty blends.  Standouts for me included:

  • Errazuriz Don Maximiano 2006, Aconcagua Valley
  • De Martino Single Vineyard “El Leon” Carignan 2007 Maule Valley
  • Vina Santa Alicia Millantu Premium Red Wine 2006 Maipo Valley
  • Viu Manent Malbec Single Vineyard San Carlos 2008 Colchagua Valley

The whole tasting was a great way to revisit some tasty value wines that are paying close attention to the land from which they grown.  Thanks to CCLTD for a really enjoyable event.

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2004 Viña Echeverría Carmenère Central Valley Reserva

Carmenère is an interesting grape. It started out as primarily a blending grape in France, but kinda’ fell out of favour… until the folks in Chile recently started putting it into a starring role. Folks down there like Errazuriz and these folks really do it justice.

And what’s this wine like? Well, it’s a jammy mix of ripe juicy plums and dark berries as well as some coffee and tobacco, which finishes with a slightly earthy edge – that pretty much sums up both the nose and the flavours.

What I’d really like to note is how this wine explodes in the mouth with its ripe fruit and coffee flavours Wow. It’s like sitting on a patio with a waft of cigar smoke while enjoying a mouthful of black cherry and blackberry juice followed by a sip of espresso. Yum.

Kirk at Kitsilano Wine Cellars pointed me toward this wine. Thanks Kirk!

Great stuff for the money.

$23 at Kitsilano Wine Cellars.

4 stars

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