Archive for the 'Mourvédre' Category

2006 Domaine Tempier “La Tourtine” Bandol

The other night I walked into Marquis Wine Cellars with an open mind – without any idea what I felt like sipping. Marquis is arguably the best shop in town to happen upon in that state of mind. Through their entrance to the right is an area piled with recent arrivals and staff picks. It was there that I found this wine.

This is my first Bandol, yet I’ve had all the grapes in the mix many time before… and why not start with a single vineyard wine from what is arguably the area’s best-known winery. What’s in the wine? Well, it can vary vintage to vintage, but it’s generally 70-80% Mourvèdre, which is rounded out with an equal blend of Grenache and Cinsault.

What’s it like? I loved the nose. It’s full of black pepper along with some burnt rubber (it fits better than you would think), ripe plum and dark berries. The flavours deliver on the promise of the nose. There’s so much going on with this wine – it’s so complex. There are layers of jammy dark fruit with a big backbone of black pepper and firm flinty tannins. Wow.

Drink it now or in 15 years. That’s your choice. It could certainly cellar for a while.

Strongly recommended.

$60 at Marquis Wine Cellars here in Vancouver.

4    1/2 stars

No comments

2007 Château de Paraza Minervois Cuvée Spéciale

Holy value alert! Along with a 2005 Di Majo Norante Contado Aglianico (review coming soon) I had a week ago, this is the best red wine value I’ve come across since I started the under-$30 challenge a while back.

This wine from Minervois, in the heart of France’s Languedoc region, is  just plain tasty. It’s a blend of Syrah (40%), Grenache (40%) and Mourvèdre (20%).

A sniff gives up some vanilla from the oak along with ripe red cherry and black pepper. A big ‘ol sip of this medium-coloured red shows juicy ripe blackberry, red cherry and plum fruit, licorice, black pepper and a nice minerality on the medium finish. It just feels good and rich in the mouth, unlike many reds in this price range.

It’s a heckuva’ value, folks. It may not blow you away, but I’m thinking it will make you raise your eyebrows and go, “Mmmm.” Not many red wines under $20 will do that these days.

$17.99 at LDB stores here in BC.

4 stars

No comments

2006 Bodegas Juan Gil Monastrell, Jumilla

OK, let’s get this under-$30 thing going… and up first is this nice bottle of juice. It’s a 100% Monastrell (Mourvèdre) from Spain’s Jumilla region in the southern province of Murcia that spends 12 months in French oak barrels.

I’m happy with this start to the challenge. Candace and I both really liked this wine. The nose is full of ripe dark plum and blackberry with a nice floral and herb edge. The flavours are a sexy blend of jammy dark ripe blackberry and plum with something like leather, tobacco and a bit of floral violet on the medium-long finish. It’s very well-balanced and the 14.5% booze isn’t at all noticeable.

I’m not sure on the vintage rating for 2006 in Jumilla, but I liked this every bit as much, if not more, than the 2004 I wrote up back in November, 2006. For what it’s worth, the Wine Dictator gave it 90 points and chose it as the #83 wine of 2009.

This is a heckuva’ good value. I’ll be drinking it again.

$24.99 at LDB stores here in BC.

4 stars

2 comments

2004 Domaine Gauby Côtes du Roussillon-Villages Vieilles Vignes

09302009So, the story goes something like this. In 1985, Gérard Gauby began making wine from his family’s grapes which had previously been sold to the local co-operative. Domaine Gauby was born from the grapes that his family had been growing for generations.

Domaine Gauby’s vineyard management is biodynamic and Gérard Gauby has become a rockstar in the Languedoc-Roussillon… What’s not to like?.. and when Kirk at Kitsilano Wine Cellars poured me a sample of their wine, I knew I had to take a bottle home. I chose this one.

According to their web site (in French) it’s made up of 35% Carignan (from 125 year-old vines), 30% Syrah (20 year-old vines), 25% Grenache (55 year old vines) and 10% Mourvèdre (25 year-old vines). That all adds up to a bloody tasty bottle of wine.

On the nose it has a bunch of cool stuff going on. There’s gorgeous ripe red berries, cherry and an herb and floral edge to it. A sip gave me even more. There’s the cherry and berry, along with licorice, the herbs (thyme? – maybe because I had some with dinner tonight) and a long and kinda’ tannic finish that goes on for over a minute.

Do I like this wine? Actually, I love it. It’s a gorgeous Old World wine with a bit of the New World’s density of flavour tossed in. It’s naturally farmed, comes from a great producer and has a very reasonable price for its quality.

$35 at Kitsilano Wine Cellars from the Farmstead folks.

4 1/2 stars

No comments

Sean Thackrey Pleiades XVII

Last Saturday night Candace and I headed out to Graham’s for a BBQ dinner and to taste a few wines… and film a few reviews. First up is Sean Thackrey’ delicious Pleiades XVII. It’s a blend of Syrah, Sangiovese, Mourvèdre, Barbera, Carignane, Petite Sirah and Viognier, among others.

Pretty amazing stuff.

$19.99 at the Bottle Barn in Santa Rosa, CA.

4 1/2 stars

5 comments

Sean Thackrey Pleiades XVI

02192009Wow. What else can you say when you taste this wine? I would actually mistake it for a Nebbiolo-based Piemontese wine… It’s just that hard to pin down. I first tasted it at Vancouver’s Salt Tasting Room a while back and had been looking for it since.

It’s a field blend of Syrah, Sangiovese, Mourvèdre, Barbera, Carignane, Petite Sirah and Viognier, among other varietals. After harvest, winemaker Sean Thackrey lets the grapes sit and “rest” at least 24 hours outside his home. Then after crush, he transfers the juice to ferment in open vats under the eucalyptus trees that surround the winery.

Thackrey doesn’t keep track of the exact percentage that ends up in each blend so it’s different from year to year. No fancy schmancy modern science-driven techniques going on here. He got his education from what he says is the world’s largest collection of ancient wine scripts and lets his palate guide the final mix. The man is a character – something his wines have in spades.

The nose is really unique, especially for a California wine. There’s tar, powerful dark cherry and a bit of citrus edged by Thackrey’s signature note of eucalyptus. A curious sip gives up tar-edged cherry fruit along with a full-bodied mouth-feel and a finish that actually builds before it starts to fade a minute later.

I could drink this all the time and when you can find it, it’s quite the value. I was lucky enough to come across it at K & L Wine Merchants on my recent trip to San Francisco for the 2009 ZAP Festival.

$22.99 USD at K & L Wine Merchants in San Francisco.

4 1/2 stars

5 comments

2005 Celler del Roure Les Alcusses, Valencia

01152009This was one of those bottles that I picked up for 2 reasons – I love Spanish wine and I liked the label. Yep, even wine geeks buy a wine because of the label occasionally. :)

When I opened it and let it grab some air I knew I was in for something surprisingly tasty. The nose gives off a beautiful mix of ripe black cherry, berry and earth. A juicy sip was all about the ripe (yes, I used that word again, but it really applies here) cherry and berry along with a really nice earthy edge to the medium-long finish. I really liked it. It fills the mouth with its rich flavours.

It’s a blend of Tempranillo, Mourvédre, Cabernet Sauvignon and Mando, which is a varietal indigenous to the Valencia area. What it all adds up to is a wine I’ll definitely buy again. Go look for it.

$24.99 at LDB stores here in BC.

4 stars

1 comment